Exploring Reason as an Innate Ability to Recognise Moral Truths: Part 2

Malick Elias

Is it possible that there are other conceptions of rational choice behaviour that do not see maximizing one’s interest in ‘a zero sum game’ as the object of human endeavour?  According to the Holy Quran, Adam (pbuh) fell from grace after being promised that by eating from a tree forbidden for him he would have immortality and power. [Pickthall commentary of chapter 20, verse:120] Elsewhere, it states that humans were created in the “best of statures”. [Pickthall on chapter 94, verse 4] Moreover, there are verses which also cites that man is neither by nature good nor bad, but has the potential to recognise both and choose between them. What is the dialectic here? Is man by his very nature evil or good; or  potentially both? Ok, how then can we understand the Aristote’s claim that ‘man is a rational animal’ in the context of this duality? Furthermore, of what benefit it is to us to have answers such as these? Continue reading Exploring Reason as an Innate Ability to Recognise Moral Truths: Part 2

In pursuit of Reason and the Rational: Part 1

‘It is the small creative minority of men who really matter; the men who create works of art or of thought, the founders of religions, and the great statesmen. These few exceptional individuals allow us to glimpse the real greatness of man. But although these leaders of mankind know how to make use of reason for their purposes, they are never men of reason. Their roots lie deeper – deep in their instincts and impulses, and in those of the society of which they are part. Creativeness is an entirely irrational , a mystical faculty…’ (K.Popper, 1995) Continue reading In pursuit of Reason and the Rational: Part 1